ECON 100B - Fall 2011 - Wood - Midterm 3 (Solution)

July 15, 2017 | Author: Jennifer Wang | Category: Inflation, Monetary Policy, Foreign Exchange Reserves, Exchange Rate, Monetary Economics
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Name: _________________________ (Last name, first name)

SID: _________________________ GSI: _________________________

Econ 100B Macroeconomic Analysis Professor Steven Wood Fall 2011

Exam #3 ANSWERS

Please sign the following oath: The answers on this test are entirely my own work. I neither gave nor received any aid while taking this test. I will not discuss the questions on this test until after 2:30 p.m. on December 13, 2011. _______________________________________ Signature Any exam turned in without a signature will be assigned a grade of zero.

Exam Instructions 1.

When drawing diagrams, clearly and accurately label all axis, lines, curves, and equilibrium points.

2.

Explanations should be written in pencil or black. Legibility is a virtue; practice good penmanship.

3.

Explanations should be succinct and to the point; make use of bullet points and common mnemonics.

4.

If you have a question, go to the aisle and ask one of the GSIs.

5.

If you need to re-draw a diagram or need more room to write your answers, use pages 2, 11, and/or 12.

6.

The exam ends promptly at 2:30 p.m. When time is called, STOP writing, immediately CLOSE your exam packet, and turn it in. You WILL BE PENALIZED if you continue to write past the official end of the exam.

Do NOT open this test until instructed to do so.

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A. Multiple Choice Questions (30 points). Circle the letter corresponding to the best answer (3 points each).

1.

Suppose you have money to lend but will do so only if you are compensated for the risk of default. If you set a high interest rate on your loan a likely consequence is that: a. b. c. d.

2.

When property rights are well defined and inexpensive to enforce: a. b. c. d.

3.

A depreciation in both the short-run and the long-run. An appreciation in both the short-run and the long-run. A depreciation in the short-run but an appreciation in the long-run. An appreciation in the short-run but a depreciation in the long-run.

Under a fixed exchange rate system, if an appreciation of a country's currency develops, the monetary authorities must intervene by: a. b. c. d.

5.

Little or no collateral is needed to secure a loan. Banks become less dominant among intermediaries. Poor borrowers are at no disadvantage relative to wealthy borrowers. Collateral is an efficient solution to asymmetric information problems.

Suppose that a country experiences a permanent increase in its inflation rate. For the country’s nominal exchange rate, this will result in: a. b. c. d.

4.

You will be prosecuted for predatory lending. Competition from other lenders will force you to lower your interest rate. Safe borrowers will look elsewhere and only risky borrowers will find your terms attractive. Risky borrowers will look elsewhere and only safe borrowers will find your terms attractive.

Selling foreign exchange. Buying foreign exchange. Reducing the foreign interest rate. Buying and selling the domestic currency.

One of the chief advantages of fixing an exchange rate is that: a. b. c. d.

It can be an effective means of reducing inflation. The currency can be used to promote export growth. A country will always be able to pursue an independent monetary policy. It allows the monetary authorities to actively respond to fluctuations in either inflation or unemployment.

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6.

The primary effect of tax smoothing is to: a. b. c. d.

7.

Seignorage is also known as an inflation tax because: a. b. c. d.

8.

Money balances lose value in real terms. Inflation can be caused by rising energy costs. Budget deficits increase in the size of the national debt. Higher interest rates can crowd-out investment spending.

In the generalized equation for the short-run aggregate supply curve, π = πe + γ(Y – YP) + ρ, an improvement in the credibility of monetary policy is represented by a change in: a. b. c. d.

9.

Reduce income inequality. Keep the tax wedge from shrinking. Avoid fluctuations in the government deficit-to-GDP ratio. Shift the debt burden from current taxpayers onto future taxpayers.

Expected inflation, πe. The supply shock term, ρ. The magnitude of the output gap, (Y – YP). The sensitivity of inflation to the output gap, γ.

Inflation targeting makes more sense than unemployment targeting because: a. b. c. d.

Monetary policies affect inflation but not unemployment. Expected unemployment is not a key determinant of the unemployment rate. Most voters and most politicians are more concerned about inflation than unemployment. A commitment to avoid high inflation is inherently more credible than a commitment to avoid high unemployment.

10. Which of the following is NOT an aspect of inflation targeting? a. b. c. d.

Increased transparency of monetary policy. Increased accountability of the central bank. An institutional commitment to a dual mandate. The public announcement of medium-term numerical inflation targets.

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B. Analytical Questions (70 points). Answer BOTH of the following questions based on the standard models developed in class. The information in the various parts of the questions is sequential and cumulative.

1.

Open Economy AD – AS Model with a Foreign Exchange Market (35 points). In the early 1990s, France and Germany were major trading partners with flexible exchange rates. Both economies were initially in general equilibrium and could be characterized with sticky wages and prices. a.

Based only on this information, use an open economy AD – AS model diagram for each country as well as a diagram of the foreign exchange market for the Germany mark to clearly and accurately show each economy’s initial equilibrium and equilibrium in the foreign exchange market. These diagrams should be drawn in BLACK.

Germany

France

LRAS

π

LRAS

π

SRAS0 π0 π2 π1

SRAS1 SRAS0 = SRAS2

π1 π0 π2

AD1

AD0 AD2

AD1 AD2 Y1 Y2

YP

Y2

YP

Y1

Y

E

E1

E1 = E0 DM1 DM0 = DM2

Exam #3 (Fall 2011)

SM

Q

AD0

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b. The following year, the Bundesbank (Germany’s central bank) conducted a contractionary monetary policy because Germany’s inflation rate was judged to be too high. On your diagrams above, clearly and accurately show what happens to economic output and inflation in each country as well as to the German mark exchange rate. These changes should be drawn in RED. c.

Provide an economic explanation of what you have drawn in your diagrams above. Be sure to discuss what happens to economic output and inflation in each country as well as to the German mark exchange rate and explain why these changes take place. When the German central bank conducts a contractionary monetary policy it will increase the German real interest rate for any level of inflation. This will cause the German AD curve to shift to the left from AD0 to AD1, resulting in a lower level of economic output at Y1 < YP and lower inflation at π1 < π0. A higher German real interest rate would make the return on German mark-denominated assets more attractive to investors (and the return on French franc-denominated assets less attractive to investors), increasing the demand for German mark-denominated assets and shifting the demand curve for German-mark denominated assets to the right from DM0 to DM1. This would cause an increase in the foreign exchange value of the German mark, i.e., the German mark has appreciated from E0 to E1. Because this appreciation of the German mark was an endogenous event in Germany it has no further effects on the German AD or German SRAS curves. However, an appreciation of the German mark is also a depreciation of the French franc. From France’s perspective, the increase in the German real interest rate is an exogenous event. Consequently, the depreciation of the French franc will make French exports less expensive to foreigners and, thereby, increase the foreign demand for French exports. As a result, the French AD curve will shift to the right from AD0 to AD1, resulting in a higher level of economic output at Y1 > YP. In addition, the depreciation of the French franc will increase the price of French imports, causing the SRAS curve to shift up from SRAS0 to SRAS1 resulting in higher inflation at π1 > π0.

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d. Immediately following the German contractionary monetary policy, but in the same year, France decides to fix its exchange rate with Germany at its initial fundamental level, a level that France is committed to maintaining. On your diagrams above, clearly and accurate show how this decision would affect economic output and inflation in each country as well as to the German mark exchange rate. These changes should be drawn in BLUE. e.

Provide an economic explanation of what you have drawn in your diagrams above. Explain exactly what the Banque de France (France’s central bank) must do to maintain this fixed exchange rate. Be sure to discuss what happens to economic output and inflation in each country as well as to the exchange rate and explain why these changes take place. Once France commits to a fixed exchange rate with the German mark at its initial fundamental level of E0, the Banque de France will have to supply the excess demand for German mark-denominated assets by selling some of its international reserves in exchange for its domestic currency. This will reduce the Banque de France’s holdings of international reserves and decrease France’s domestic money supply. The decrease in the French domestic money supply would increase the French real interest rate for any level of inflation. A higher French real interest rate would make the return on French franc-denominated assets more attractive to investors (and the return on German mark-denominated assets less attractive to investors), reducing the demand for Germanmark denominated assets and shifting the demand curve for German-mark denominated assets to the left from DM1 back to DM0. This action will returned the foreign exchange value of the German mark from E1 to E0. The exchange rate has now been fixed at E0. Because the French central bank acted immediately to fix the exchange rate at its initial fundamental level of E0, the price of French imports did not increase. Consequently, the French SRAS curve would now be at SRAS2 = SRAS0 (or have shifted back from SRAS1 to SRAS2 = SRAS0) The decrease in the French domestic money supply would also cause the French AD curve to shift to the left from AD1 to AD2, reducing economic output from Y1 to Y2 < YP and reducing inflation from π1 to π2. (Because the decrease in inflation would also cause the French domestic real interest rate to decline endogenously, the foreign exchange intervention above would have to account for this effect.) At the end of the year, France will have maintained a fixed exchange rate with the German mark at E0. However, in order to do so, France had to have a higher domestic real interest rate which reduced economic output to below its potential level at Y2 < YP, leaving France with a negative output gap. In addition, inflation has been reduced to below its initial level at π2 < π0. In Germany, the actions of the Banque de France to fixed the exchange rate means that the foreign exchange value of the German mark did not appreciate and, therefore, there was no reduction in net exports because of a stronger German mark. This would cause the German AD curve to shift to the right from AD1 to AD2, increasing German economic output from Y1 to Y2. However, because the German real interest rate has increased (from the initial contractionary policy), economic output is still below its potential level, i.e., Y2 < YP. In addition, inflation has been reduced to below its initial level at π2 < π0. In the final analysis, both Germany and France have higher real interest rates, lower levels of economic activity, and lower inflation. By maintaining a fixed exchange rate, France is forced to match whatever monetary policy changes that Germany makes.

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2.

AD – SRAS – LRAS Model (35 points). Suppose that the economy is initially in general equilibrium, that complete Ricardian equivalence holds, and that the economy can be characterized by sticky wages and prices. a.

Based only on this information, use an AD-AS model diagram to clearly and accurately show the economy’s initial general equilibrium situation. This diagram should be drawn in BLACK.

π LRAS1

LRAS0

SRAS2 SRAS1 SRAS0

π1 π2 = π0

AD0

AD2

Y2

Exam #3 (Fall 2011)

Y P1

Y1

Y P0

Y

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b. In the following year, the government enacts a contractionary fiscal policy by increasing personal tax rates because of concerns over a rising debt-to-GDP ratio. This results in a sharp reduction in the labor force participation rate. On your diagram above, clearly and accurately show what happens to economic output and inflation. These changes should be drawn in RED. c.

Provide an economic explanation of what you have drawn in your diagram above. Be sure to discuss what happens to economic output and inflation and explain why these changes take place. When complete Ricardian equivalence holds, taxpayers perfectly foresee and perfectly compensate for all changes in future tax liabilities. Thus, while a contractionary fiscal policy of increasing personal tax rates would increase government saving, it would also reduce private saving by exactly the same amount. As a result, there would be no change in national saving and the AD curve would remain at AD0. (The contractionary fiscal policy would shift the AD curve to the left but an exact compensating change in consumption would shift the AD curve to the right.) However, this increase in personal tax rates caused a sharp reduction in the labor force participation rate, resulting in a decrease in the size of the labor force. A reduced labor supply would reduce the economy’s potential economic output, causing the LRAS curve to shift left from LRAS0 to LRAS1. The reduced labor supply would also increase the real wage and, therefore, the cost of production at any level of economic output, causing the SRAS curve to shift up from SRAS0 to SRAS1. As a result of these supply-side changes, potential economic output would decline from YP0 to YP1, actual economic output would decline from YP0 to Y1, and inflation would increase from π0 to π1.

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d. In the following year, the central bank begins targeting inflation at the initial inflation rate. On your diagram above, clearly and accurately show what happens to economic output and inflation. These changes should be drawn in BLUE. e.

Provide an economic explanation of what you have drawn in your diagram above. Be sure to discuss what happens to economic output and inflation and explain why these changes take place. Because there is now a positive output gap, actual inflation is greater than expected inflation. This will cause expected inflation to increase, shifting the SRAS curve up from SRAS1 to SRAS2. (SRAS2 will intersect the LRAS curve LRAS1 at YP1 and π1.) If the central bank now begins to target inflation at its initial level of π0, it will have to engage in a contractionary monetary policy, increasing the real interest rate for any level of inflation. This will cause the AD curve to shift to the left from AD0 to AD2 where the intersection of AD2 and SRAS2 equals π0. As a result of this contractionary monetary policy, economic output is now below its potential level, i.e., Y2 < YP1 and inflation is at its targeted level of π0. (In subsequent years, in order to maintain inflation at its target level of π0, the central bank will have to adjust its monetary policy to account for the changes in expected inflation that result because actual inflation is less than expected inflation due to a negative output gap.)

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